<![CDATA[Mr. Sixta's Classes - US Hist Year 1]]>Thu, 10 Mar 2016 04:54:48 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[fINALS]]>Sat, 17 Jan 2015 20:09:02 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/finalsI hope that everyone is enjoying their extra long weekend. Next Thursday is the last day of the semester and all missing, late, or revised assignments need to be turned in by the end of the day. Check your grade on FamilyLink and see if there are any assignment which you could work on over the weekend and turn in on Tuesday.
We will be having a final for U.S. History in class on Wednesday. Please bring a pencil or two with you to class. Notes will not be allowed for the test but we will review some of the material on Tuesday. Our study guide is posted below and can be opened as either a PDF or Word Document.
us_history_final_study_guide_smester_1.pdf
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us_history_final_study_guide_semester_1.docx
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<![CDATA[Progressive Politics]]>Sat, 03 Jan 2015 20:36:38 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/progressive-politicsThe laws and policies in our country are not static. Citizens make them and change them for specific reasons and often in response to specific events that capture the public's attention. For this assignment you will have the opportunity to read excerpts from some speeches, letters, and books that helped to shape national opinion at the turn of the century. Additionally, you will evaluate some political cartoons that were used as propaganda to shape public policy. Read through the texts and then answer the subsequent questions. 
progressive_era_primary_sources_student_handout.docx
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progressive_era_primary_source_documents.pdf
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<![CDATA[Death of the Organic city]]>Thu, 20 Nov 2014 00:00:09 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/death-of-the-organic-cityStudents are to finish reading chapter 10 "Death of the Organic City" in Down to Earth (page 155-169). Then write a short multiparagraph response to the following prompt: 
“As the century drew to a close, the explosion of cities paradoxically made Americans more diverse and more similar at the same time.” Assess the validity of this statement.



Enjoy your break and don't forget to come for conferences.]]>
<![CDATA[November 13th, 2014]]>Thu, 13 Nov 2014 14:15:24 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/november-13th-2014Last week we began watching Inequality for All on Netflix. This film chronicles the changes of Middle Class income and wealth since the Great Depression. Economies are created by the governments through which they operate and it is important to evaluate how citizen response to capital accumulation and exploitation during the Gilded Age changed the way our economy functioned. On Monday we will finish watching Inequality for All and on Wednesday and Thursday we will be creating a Report Card for the Economy and use it to evaluate the US economy between 1860-1900 and the US economy today.


inequality_for_all_film_guide.pdf
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economy_report_card.pdf
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economic_report_card_rubric.pdf
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<![CDATA[Butte creek watershed]]>Fri, 24 Oct 2014 22:28:25 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/butte-creek-watershedWe've taken two field trips this month to investigate our local watershed. Earlier this month we visited the breached dams at Gary Harrington's home. Mr. Harrington has been involved in a dispute with the state for several years over his dams and served time in jail this past summer for it.
Yesterday we went to the water springs where Butte Creek begins and were given a tour by Dennis Burg.
Additional Resources
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<![CDATA[America's industrial revolution]]>Fri, 24 Oct 2014 22:10:27 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/americas-industrial-revolutionOver the next few weeks we will be reading and learning about industrial growth in America from 1860-1910. We began our unit by looking at modern day frustrations towards Wall Street as expressed by the Occupy Wall Street movement and Bruce Springsteen's 2012 album Wrecking Ball. Students are to read Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States pages 253-267; 282-295 by Monday (10/27). This coming week we will spend Monday having a lecture about Robber Barons and an overview of the Zinn chapter, on Tuesday and Wednesday we will play Monopoly.
Articles of Interest
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<![CDATA[Shakespeare & the harlem renaissance]]>Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:38:52 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/shakespeare-the-harlem-renaissanceEarlier this month we attended the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) in Ashland. Our class first went to the Medford Public Library to see our History Made By You exhibit which will be on display until November 6. If you haven't seen it yet and want to learn more about Butte Falls; go see it today! At the OSF we attended a production of A Comedy of Errors, which is being preformed by an African American cast and has been transported to the Harlem Renaissance. Prior to attending the play we watched a bit of Zero Mostel in A Funny Think Happened on the Way to the Forum to observe some of the elements in classical Roman comedy theater. 
After the play we also created a classroom map of some events in the African-American narrative. To complete this portion of the play read and summarize at least one article from PBS's The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. Your summary should have a clear title and one hand drawn image that represents the topic which you read about.

Assignments
preplayalternativeassignment.pdf
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postplayassignment.docx
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<![CDATA[Nez Perce]]>Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:19:52 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/nez-perceLooking at the issue of Indian removal in our own state, students watched PBS's New Perspectives on the West. Part of our focus with this unit is to introduce the concepts of "just war", which we will come back to as we study America's reluctance and eventual engagement with both World War I and World II and then US military engagement in the Vietnam War. The topic of American military removal of the Nez Perce is particularly relevant to discuss because as Oregonians we continue to occupy the land and benefit from the removal of the Nez Perce, thus their history continues to influence us today.

Assignment
Create a response to the following questions. Your response should include references to classroom discussions, texts watched, and materials read.
  1. Do you consider the fighting between the Nez Perce and the US Government to be a just war?
  2. What do you think Chief Joseph should have done?
  3. Why do you think that Chief Joseph chose the course of action that he did? Do you think that he made the right decision?
  4. Describe how you feel that the Nez Perce were treated by the US Government?


Additional Resources
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<![CDATA[The Unforgiving West]]>Tue, 23 Sep 2014 05:51:05 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/the-unforgiving-westLast week we briefly looked at the Owen's Valley and how the Big Butte Creek watershed around town provides water for Medford. In October we are planning to take two field trips to look at and learn about the watershed by meeting with Dennis Burg and Gary Harrington, two individuals intimately connected to water usage and rights issues in the area.
This week students selected a specific topic in the history of the West to read and write about. As a class we will be learning about the Nez Pierce.

Open House Thursday (9/25) at 6pm. I hope to see you and your families there.]]>
<![CDATA[Watersheds]]>Tue, 09 Sep 2014 23:21:29 GMThttp://mrsixta.weebly.com/us-hist-year-1/watershedsOver the coming year we will be visiting multiple sites in the Rogue River Watershed, though we will specifically focus our attention on Big Butte Creek and Ginger Creek. Today students selected groups and topics which they will focus on during our trips. Each group will have specific tasks when we take our field trips and the descriptions for each group are listed below. Wednesday and Thursday we will be out in the field.

Team Dirt
Determine the soil moisture at the study sites. Using a trowel or stick you will scrap the surface of the ground and obtain soil samples from underneath the surface.  Examine soils for such characteristics such as color, texture and smell.  You should also not plant material and organisms in the soil.
We will use the soil sample kit to measure ph, nutrients, and other tests.

Team Animals
Record the various kind of animals at each site (insects, birds, reptiles, fish, frogs, mammals, or tadpoles). Collect evidence of animals such as scat, tracks, burrows or leaves that have been chewed.

Team H2 the O
Will use the water sampling kit to measure ph, nutrients, temperature, flow, clarity and other tests.

Team Stuff That’s Growing
Observe the various kinds of plants at each site (large trees, small trees, shrubs, small plants, grasses). Specifically, identify and measure areas covered by invasive species. Record the most common kinds of plants found in each location and note where they grow relative to others. Also, look for blight, pest or other signs of plant health.

Team Lay of the Land
Determine if the site is flat or sloped and record all land features that affect the study site (tall buildings, roads, parking lots, cliffs, etc). Determine the direction that water is flowing. Create a rough map of the site and procure a topographic map for classroom use.

Team Solar
Determine wind movement and how much sunlight reaches the ground at each site. Analyze how shade and sun impact the stream habitat. What type of plants and animals should expect to see in this area?
Measure each sites temperature at ground level (1 inch below soil), 1 yard above the soil, 1 inch above the water and 1 yard above the water.




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